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Since 2006 a total of 38 peregrines have fledged successfully from the Bath Peregrines nest box.

Year
L/H/R/F
Gender (Blue Ring)

2006

4/4/4/4

Not Recorded

2007

?/2/2/2

M(AA) F(AB)

2008

?/2/2/2

u/k(AC) u/k(AD)

2009

?/1/1/1

F(AP)

2010

4/4/4/4

F(BZ) F(CA) M(CB) F(CC)

2011

4/3/3/3

M(CT) F(CV) u/k(CX)

2012

4/2/2/2

M(DR) F(DS)

2013

4/2/2/2

F(GA) M(GB)

2014

4/1/1/1

F(HG)

2015

4/3/3/3

F(JX) F(JY) M(JZ)

2016

3/3/3/3

M(KP) F(KR) u/k (believed M - not ringed)

2017

4/4/4/4

F(PW) F(PX) F(PY) M(PZ)

2018

4/4/3/3

M(TA) M(TB) F(TC)

2019

4/4/4/4

M(TR) F(TW) F(TV) F(TX)

2020

4/4/-/-

 

L/H/R/F = Laid / Hatched / Reared / Fledged

The current breeding tiercel at the site (Blue Ringed AA) was bred at Bath in 2007, and as is quite common with males he stayed into the following year.  In 2008 the adult pair bred successfully again but the male disappeared.  So, again nothing out of the ordinary, AA assisted with the feeding and rearing of the brood.  However, he stayed into 2009, and from then until 2013 he mated with his mother; not common, but not unknown.

In 2014 we had a change of falcon, the mechanism of which we didn’t see, and she has been the resident ever since.

This year:

The breeding pair’s courtship rituals were first observed on the camera system in late December 2019, and copulation was observed from Late January 2020.

Four eggs were laid on 13th (13:47), 15th (21:51), 18th (03:25) and 20th (12:02) March, and both birds shared the incubation.

All four eggs hatched between 20 and 23 April 2020 (20th (20:15), 21st (1841), 22nd (11:06) and 23rd (15:12), and in a change from previous years the falcon appears to be accepting the tiercel’s presence in the nest box. 

From the point of view of feeding, the eyasses essentially they go through four stages:

1 - they behave impeccably, sitting in front of the falcon waiting to be fed

2 - when they start filling out and can't all sit in front of the falcon, each will eat its fill and 'shuffle' to the back of the queue

3 - then they compete with each other for the food the falcon provides

4 - once the eyasses are feathered and mobile in the nest, mostly in the interests of their own safety the adults drop the food and run

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